Friday, March 24, 2017

Waffles for Our Lady!

The Annunciation by Fra Angelico source

Tomorrow is the Solemnity of the Annunciation of the Lord. The day when the angel Gabriel announced to Mary that she would conceive a son, named Jesus. It is exactly nine months before the birth of Jesus. So do we know the exact dates when these events took place in history? No, although they did take place in human history.  We have record of the birth of Jesus outside of Scripture from non-Christian witnesses. Feast days, as we call them, are days set by the Church in order to commemorate important events in our Salvation history; or to commemorate certain saints.

On the Solemnity of the Annunciation, we celebrate the fact that Mary's yes brought about our salvation. Becuase of Mary, who was Immaculately conceived, God was able to be born and "dwell amongst men." God came amongst us! Can you wrap your head around that one? No other religious leaders in human history claimed to be God. In no other religion does God intervene in human history. He said, alright, you don't get this, you don't seem to understand my love, so I'll come and show you myself. That's it!

Here's a basic breakdown of the different types of feasts we celebrate in the Church from Catholic Straight Answers.

Solemnities are the most important celebrations. They begin at vespers (evening prayer) of the day before. During the Mass celebration, we say the Gloria and the Creed.  Sundays and Holy Days of Obligation (U.S. Holy Days of Obligation are: Mary Mother of God, Ascension, Assumption, All Saints, Immaculate Conception, and Christmas) are solemnities.  Other solemnities are St. Joseph (March 19), Sacred Heart of Jesus (Friday after the Feast of Corpus Christi), and St. Peter and St. Paul (June 29).

Feasts are of second importance. They do not have a first vespers or Vigil Mass.  An exception would be the feasts of the Lord which occur on Sundays in Ordinary Time and Sundays during the Christmas season.  For example, the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord (February 2) has its own first vespers.  On these days, the Gloria is recited but not the Creed.

Finally, there are the memorials, which are classified as either obligatory or optional.  Memorials commemorate a saint or saints.  Obligatory memorials must be observed (meaning celebrated in the liturgy) whereas optional memorials do not have to be observed.  For example, St. John Bosco (January 31) is obligatory while the memorial of St. Blase (February 3) is optional.  Only the memorials of those saints who are of “universal significance” are observed by the whole Church and marked in the general liturgical calendar.

Other feast days would be local saints to a country, town, diocese or religious order. 

One note: often we will hear the word feast used to refer to any liturgical commemoration, such as the Feast of the Annunciation, rather than Solemnity of the Annunciation. It is still referring to the solemnity.

So how exactly do we celebrate this day? So up until now, we haven't really celebrated this day in particular other than going to Mass. But now, that our children are a bit older we would like to add on some new traditions to commemorate certain liturgical feasts. The richness of the Catholic faith is that everything has meaning. Some traditions are not necessarily universal and some we just kind of make-up on our own. The point is that we commemorate this celebration with something not only festive but memorable so that the children will note that it is a special day. That gives us parents the opportunity to explain why it is a special day. A teaching moment. Always great!

So on this day, we will make waffles! Yep! Waffles. Why you ask? It's kind of a silly and fun tradition. Why not! Well over at Catholic Cuisine she points out that in Sweden, it is known as Vaffeldagen or Waffle day which is similar to Varfrudagen, which means Feast of the Annunciation, or, "Our Lady's Day." So why not have waffles in honor of Our Lady's yes!



So have fun cooking up those waffles!  Only I used a Belgian Waffle recipe :)

Here's the recipe from food.com

Ingredients: 
2 cups flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
1⁄2 teaspoon salt
1⁄4 cup sugar
2 eggs, separated
1⁄2 cup oil
2 cups milk

Directions:
Sift the dry ingredients together in a large bowl.
Separate the eggs.
In small bowl, beat egg whites until stiff.
Mix together the egg yolks, milk and oil and stir slightly.
Add to dry ingredients and mix well.
Fold in beaten egg whites.
Cook in waffle iron.


Thursday, March 23, 2017

Five Tips to dealing with PDD (Depression) Aleteia

I used to think I was just a chronic pessimist, until I discovered I had persistent depressive disorder.

I have battled persistent depressive disorder (PDD), previously known as dysthymia, for most of my life. It means that more often than not, I find myself in a low mood. I always thought I was just a chronic pessimist. Major life events, such as changes in schooling or friendships, exacerbated my condition. However, despite my persistent blues, I was resourceful and got by, even if gloomy clouds were never too far off.
After moving back from living abroad, I had a serious bout with major depression. I could hardly get out of bed in the morning. It was the first time in my life that I sought help for my depression from a medical doctor, and I was diagnosed with PDD. At first I felt a sense of relief. I was finally able to put a name to what I had felt for so long.


Almost immediately my doctor suggested medication. At first, I refused. Feeling defeated, I opted to seek therapy to sort through my emotions instead. It felt as if I had spent my whole life trudging through a dense jungle of emotions. Yet, armed with a machete of my persistence, I had managed to cut through the brush of despondence and survive. Yet, deep down I knew that therapy would not be enough.

To read more please click here.



Thursday, March 16, 2017

Lent Challenge: Be with your children and NOT technology!


"There are countless reasons you'll catch me on my smartphone
or worse, my laptop, during the day..."


There are still almost four weeks to go until Holy Week. It seems like an eternity, but this year I am taking it as a challenge, to become a better person. Lent, as we have seen, is a time of sacrifice and of prayer. Above all things, it is a time to focus on the Sacrifice of all sacrifices.

So, what is your greatest sacrifice? What is it that challenges you?

I want to challenge all moms and dads out there.

Here is the deal:

I have come across countless articles about how technology is ruining our children. There are a plethora of stats warning us how screen time can alter our children's brains. "Diagnoses of ADHD, autism, coordination disorder, developmental delays, unintelligible speech, learning difficulties, sensory processing disorder, anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders are associated with technology overuse, and are increasing at an alarming rate." (source) Yet, where are the stats of how our phone and screen time use impacts our children?

Does our use of technology affect our children? YES! YES! YES!

Meg Meeker, a wonderful best-selling author, and pediatrician points out that "...parents often showed annoyance at children when the parents were interrupted from their phones. And the little interaction that parents or caregivers had with their children were more negative or harsh. (source)

I am guilty of this. So, very, darn guilty! There are countless reasons you'll catch me on my smartphone or worse, my laptop, during the day. There are phone calls, texts, WhatsApp messages from distant family and friends, Pinterest, Facebook, work I have to get done, etc. Must I go on?

The truth is none of that is as important as my children. I will admit that without hesitation. Then why is it always pressing to answer that text? Why do I have look at facebook one last time before I finally set the phone down? Why didn't get my work done before my children got home from school? Yes, my friends, it is an addiction and it's not pretty.





"Do you find that putting the phone away equates to cutting off a limb, leaving you figuratively handicap and literally restless for the rest of the day?"


Here we are trying to protect our children from the horrors of screen. Yet, what kind of example are we setting if they see us using technology constantly?  The buck stops here! I am taking up my own challenge this Lent. How about you?

Do you see yourself caught up in technology? Do you not give your children the attention they desire and deserve? Do you find that putting the phone away equates to cutting off a limb, leaving you figuratively handicap and literally restless for the rest of the day? If this sounds familiar then I invite you to take up this challenge.

Put. Down. Your. Phone.

Put. Away. Your. Laptop.

Put. Away. Your. Tablet.

Just do it. Put it all away in time for when your kids come home from school. Let them have your attention. It doesn't mean you have to sit there and be at their beck and call. It means really listening to them and being there for them. It means not getting agitated when they interrupt our hundreth text of the day. It means playing with them for a bit. Going for a walk or a bike ride. Preparing dinner with them or simply sitting down and reading a book together.

Try to make all your important phone calls/texts while they are at school. Try to limit them while they are home. Make texting and posting on Facebook a big no-no while they are around.  You can even put your phone on "do not disturb" if you are brave enough. I place my phone in another room where I can still hear it if I need to take a call. I also tell my husband if he needs me (aka emergency) to call twice.

You will soon notice your children's behavior change, for the better. You will see a change in yourself and in your family all together. You will be more patient and at peace. Kids are worth it. Don't you think?  Let's be there for our kids. Let's show them that there is more to life than technology. Let's place family first and enjoy the simpler things in life. How do you want your children to remember you? Hunched texting on your smartphone? Or spending afternoons together enjoying each others company?

Technology can wait. Put your children first!



Sunday, March 12, 2017

Lent, a journey towards greater things

The LORD said to Abram: "Go forth from the land of your kinsfolk and from your father's house to a land that I will show you. "I will make of you a great nation, and I will bless you; I will make your name great, so that you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you and curse those who curse you. All the communities of the earth shall find blessing in you." Abram went as the LORD directed him.


So many instances in Scripture we see that those who obey the will of the Lord are promised great things. These great things may not be of considerable value to this world, but they are great indeed. I envision this promise of God to Abram and imagine his enthusiasm and fear. I can almost feel his joy and his sorrow, his sense of obligation and his free will. It's as if this all exudes from his heart at the same time.

Doing the will of God is never an easy task. Following God's commands takes courage and strength, not found in ordinary human hearts. This type of strength only comes from God's grace. Exactly what we need is what we must ask for. Exactly what will pull us through is what we lack. Our work for God is only done by God through us. Ironic, isn't it?

That's a little bit of our journey through Lent. A lot of the sacrifices we may be making may not be easy to come by, but we get by on His grace. Our sacrifice only has meaning through His Sacrifice. So my fasting is empty and a mere diet if it is not joined with prayer. I must replace my being off of Facebook with an act of service, if not I risk this extra time being void of meaning. Sacrifice is empty without His Sacrifice. 

Lent is a time where we can join what we "give up" or "take on" with what Jesus gave up on this earth and what He took on: the Cross. These forty days lead up to a culmination where all our sacrifices are nailed on the Cross. We become privileged participants in something that has been done for us. We are no longer spectators. "Now I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh, I am filling up what is lacking in the afflictions of Christ on behalf of his body, which is the church." Col. 1:24

How amazing is God that He allows us to join our most puny little sacrifices to the greatest offering of all time? God never stops giving! He always gives us a chance to be a part of His greatness. To be holy as he is holy! He promises us, like He did Abram, greater things. Great things come with some form of renunciation. Every yes, comes with many no's.  

Abram left his homeland. In his yes, he renounced so much. We too are asked to leave our homeland of sorts: leave our comfort zones; forgo the pleasures we are so used to. We are even able to give up the things that we need and desire, such as food. All this, so that we may obtain a greater good. A supreme good. In our yes, we proclaim that God alone suffices and we prepare ourselves for what will be in the next life.  

Lent is a journey of learning, where, each year, if we will, we can delve deeper into this mystery of sacrifice. 

What have you taken on? What have you given up? Are you joining it to prayer? Are you joining it to the one Sacrifice that gives it meaning?

Be reminded that "...all things work for good for those who love God." Romans 8:28



Tuesday, March 7, 2017

The Lenten Journey



"The Sacrifice of Our Lord Jesus Christ is the reason we are even able to make sacrifices in the first place."


Okay, the first week of Lent here and there is no better time to extract truth, goodness, and beauty than now.  I will be making it a point to blog during Lent. No better time then when you are trying to stick to good habits and discipline.

Lent is a time of prayer, fasting, and almsgiving. This is the time, as good as any really, to really dig into the faith and realize that we can give it all to God. Our day is filled with opportunities for Lenten sacrifices. Sure, the typical, not eating between meals, giving up sweets, staying off of Facebook, are good ways to gather up your strength through self-control and discipline, but how about what you take on? Lent is not always about giving up. Sometimes taking on things, can be just as difficult or even more difficult.

This Lent I want to take you on a journey of how we can take on and yes, give up the things that are a bit outside of the box. How about taking on a bit more compassion while driving? How about really making efforts to be on time to your appointments? How about not really caring what other people think?

Let's share this time of Lent and let us dig into to all the beauty the Church offers us in preparing ourselves for the Sacrifice that makes sense of all of our sacrifices. The Sacrifice of Our Lord Jesus Christ is the reason we are even able to make sacrifices in the first place. Our difficulties, even the most minute, even those we purposely take on, have a redeemable quality only because He redeemed us by His life. That one whopper of a ticket that Jesus redeemed by giving His life up on the Cross, basically cashed in all tickets of suffering for all of eternity, as long as they are united to Him.

Make this Lent count and make each day count by remaining connected and aware that each day we gather up our strength in self-discipline and self-control, we are preparing ourselves for the things this world does not prepare us for, preparing our hearts for eternity.

Have a blessed Lenten journey!


The Secret to being a more patient parent (Aleteia)


Becoming a new mom was probably one of the most magnificent experiences of my life. It was a time filled with wonder and worries, anxiety and excitement. Yet, in the midst of all these mixed emotions, I could only envision moments of tenderness and pure love with my soon to be newborn. Sure, motherhood would be difficult and there would be great challenges, but I was certain love would conquer all. I soon learned that simple moments of prayer would be the best source of grace and much-needed strength that would get me through the toughest moments that lay ahead.

The day finally arrived. Our first son was born. Then, less than two years later, we were blessed with another baby boy. We had our share of sleepless nights and “napping while baby napped” simply didn’t suffice. Even so, my heart was brimming with love. I reached out to friends who were veteran moms and they helped me through the rough spots. But indeed, it was prayer that always gave me a sense of peace and reassurance. During quiet nap times or while our youngest son nursed, I spoke to God. Those were my moments of great grace, and they saw me through.